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Archive for the ‘Scripture’ Category

~ Written by Cassie Rayl

“Can I pray for you two?” He asked while his hands, shaking because of Parkinson’s, grabbed both of us without waiting for an answer. As we do every time we go see my husband’s grandpa, we gladly agreed. Grandpa’s eyes filled with tears as he turned scripture into prayer, and prayer into a blessing over our lives.

He tagged onto the end of his prayer, “Jesus, they’re doing great things, um, this man and his wife. Just bless them. I love them so much. Amen.”

Then it was my turn to tear up. Parkinson’s and age have slowly been taking independence away from this man who has adopted me as his own because I married his grandson. His memory has slowly clouded out names and other important information. In so many ways, the frustration alone could have filled him with bitterness and anger.

But it doesn’t. Instead, those things make him press even more deeply into love and faith. It doesn’t matter that he can’t remember our roles in ministry. It doesn’t matter that he can’t remember our names. In that moment, he wanted Jesus in our midst, and nothing was going to stop him from being the tool Jesus used to bless our lives.

Grandpa didn’t have to know everything, he just had to know the Master.  

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~ Written by Viki Rife

How are we to respond to the situation last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia? A look at our history can give us some important clues.

When the Civil War started, the Brethren, who were pacifists, remained committed to their refusal to wound another human. They did not enlist. This brought them under suspicion from both sides.

However, they also had strong abolitionist beliefs. Many were already involved in the Underground Railroad and in purchasing slaves in order to set them free. When the war started, they ramped up their efforts within the guidelines of their conscience.

Their part in the Battle of Antietam is an example of the spirit of followers of Christ. Soldiers from both sides were wreaking havoc on the farms and burning the homes of these peaceful people. Remember, they hadn’t taken sides, so neither side protected them as “theirs.”

However, these brave souls went out into the fields and even Antietam Creek. They rescued as many wounded Union and Confederate soldiers as they could, taking them into their homes.

When they ran out of room there, they took them to their church, turning it into a hospital where enemies were placed side by side for treatment. When you visit the Antietam Battlefield Memorial, you can see the church and hear the story.

These people lived within the boundaries they believed God called them to. However, that did not keep them from being ministers of reconciliation in the world. They went out of their way to care for the very people who were destroying their property. They showed grace to everyone, even though they stood against what the Confederates were fighting for.

The early Brethren were very aware that their citizenship belonged first to the kingdom of heaven. They put into practice the instructions of Jesus through the Apostle Paul, “Do not repay evil with evil or insult with insult. On the contrary, repay evil with blessing, because to this you were called so that you may inherit a blessing” (1 Peter 3:9).

(To find out more about beliefs of the early Brethren on racism, read “The Better View” in the current issue of Women’s Spectrum magazine. Find out more here.

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~ Written by Sharon MacMillan 

If there were ducks to be placed in a row, they would be fluttering in all directions. My husband and I feel like we are in a Stage Nine hurricane. Circumstances around us are blowing out of control. We’re trying to finish study projects. Fix up our home to sell. Move to Texas in May so I can get to Japan by June to help my son’s family welcome their twins. I catch my frenetic self over-thinking how to solve things, only to be set back to where I started. I feel like I’m lying face down in the mud, like a storm-blown fence, waiting for someone to help me up so I can move on to the next set of circumstances.

Then I remember to whom I belong. I am the daughter of the Almighty God, the Master Builder, the Perfect Manager of everything. I go into His presence a bit shy for being so slow to turn my mess over to Him. But I don’t find condemnation or see a finger pointing. I see arms that welcome me in. His presence is the place of peace, safety, security, and help. What was I thinking, trying to manage life without Him?

Then I realize He’s arranged my hurricane so I would come to Him. He wants to teach me something from his treasure box of riches. His Word reads, “I will bless the Lord who has given me counsel, my heart instructs me in the night seasons. I have set the Lord before me because He is at my right hand, I shall not be moved.”

My heart feels the warmth of His love. I read on. “You will show me the path of life; in your presence is fullness of joy. At your right hand are pleasures forevermore.

God is delighted and honored as I answer those who say, “How did you get through all those circumstances?” I tell them, “It was the Perfect Manager who helped us. He’s known for doing all things well.” 

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~ Written by Sue Knight

Forgive and forget.

Forgive and move on.

Forgive, but return to the offense and allow it to overwhelm you once again.

Forgive and plot your revenge for later.   

You can fill in the blank to this familiar phrase using a variety of words. Personally, I do not adhere to the “forgive and forget” camp (nor to any of the other options listed above). It is true that memories can be triggered at a most unexpected moment and an avalanche of thoughts comes rushing back into our hearts and minds. However, it is what I do with those thoughts that counts.

When I look back on the hurts and offenses I have experienced in my life, I am learning to say, “Thank you, God, for this reminder of how important forgiveness is.”

Forgiveness is as much for the offended as it is for the offender. God granted us forgiveness before we even knew we were sinners and separated from Him. Ephesians 4:29-32 speaks directly to forgiveness – “Get rid of all bitterness, rage and anger, brawling and slander, along with every form of malice. Be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving each other, just as in Christ, God forgave you.” A powerful step to take, one which can bring God’s healing balm to soothe our pain as we ask God to give us a Christ-like heart of forgiveness.

But does a painful ordeal end with forgiveness? While forgiveness can be both thrilling and powerful, if we are able to experience reconciliation as a result of that forgiveness, it is even more exciting. Max Lucado has said, “The key to forgiving others is to quit focusing on what they did to you and start focusing on what God did for you.” Forgiveness is required by God. The next step, reconciliation, is forgiveness in action.

The process of reconciliation depends upon the attitude of both the offended and the offender. The wounds which hurt so deeply in the beginning have been replaced by scars. Forgive and forget? Forgetting is just about impossible because of the way God uses painful experiences to shape our lives. The scars left behind are just that, something we don’t think about a lot, but every once in a while, we notice them. Ask our Father to use these times as a reminder to thank Him that they represent forgiveness and perhaps reconciliation—reconciliation as illustrated by the Cross.

The purpose of the Cross is to repair the irreparable. Jesus Christ reconciled the human race, putting it back to where God designed it to be. We have not only experienced that reconciliation through our salvation, but recognize that reconciliation has brought us back together into oneness with God. Praise God—forgiveness is the prelude to reconciliation. 

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~ Written by Rosa Muñoz

It all started with a wake-up call in July of 2015: extreme unexplained abdominal pain, gastritis, and fatty deposits in my liver. At that stage of life, I couldn’t find an answer to my physical problems. One day, desperate, I fell to my knees and cried out to God for wisdom.

I heard God speak to my heart, “Rosa Lydia, start walking and change your eating habits, and you will have better health.” I decided to set up short-term goals to become more active physically and to lose my extra weight. I began by walking three days a week for the first month; the second I added much more activity. As the months passed, I began to see changes in my health.

Two passages helped me keep going: Hebrews 12:1-2 and Romans 12:1-2. Although I am not physically running, I can say that God has allowed me to live and see good results in this new endeavor. During this difficult process, He has given me strength, wisdom, and energy to celebrate small victories in the loss of thirty pounds. I realized how much my physical health was affecting my emotional state, and that I needed to be a better steward of this body God has given me.

I have come to understand that being intentional, persistent, and totally dependent on God will give me the power to keep running toward the goal.

Hebrews 12:1-2

Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, 2 looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God. (ESV)

Romans 12:1-2

I appeal to you therefore, brothers,[a] by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship.[b] 2 Do not be conformed to this world,[c]but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.

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~ Written by Viki Rife

I couldn’t get out of bed, not even to walk eight feet into the bathroom. If my feet touched the floor, my plans would be ruined.

I had asked God to wake me up at 5 a.m. because I couldn’t use an alarm. I had already learned that if I made any sound at all, at least one of my three children would wake up. I was desperate for time with God before the craziness of my day started.

I reached for my Bible. Two minutes later, there was a knock on the door. It had to be our two-year-old — he wasn’t yet tall enough to turn the handle.

Sighing, I went to let him in. “Come snuggle with me,” I told him. “Mommy’s going to pray.” I opened the small yellow notebook that contained my prayer reminders. At the top of each page was a name, and below was a list of ways I was praying for that person. As I turned each page, I would tell my son who we were praying for and what details were on the list. Then we would pray together.

After that he started coming in every morning. Within a few days he was volunteering to pray for certain requests. When a prayer was answered, I would let him place the check mark beside it.

One day he said, “Can I hold the book?” With great reverence he took the little prayer book and placed it on his lap. He opened it and said, “This page is about Daddy.”

“How should we pray for Daddy?” I asked him. To my surprise, he knew the entire list. That day he went through the prayer notebook telling me what each page said.

Now, thirty years later, I can look back and see that those morning interruptions were God’s way of answering my prayers. I had asked God to help my children be prayer warriors. He showed me how to help them develop their prayer life through helping them experience it. It leaves me wondering how many other interruptions in my life are opportunities in disguise.

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~ Written by Viki Rife

Sometimes, a verse you’ve read many times before suddenly jumps off the page and leaves you breathless. That happened to me the other day. God had done His careful groundwork by causing me to ask: ”Is God pleased with me?” I can run all over doing ministry, and spend hours in the Word and prayer, yet still be left with the nagging question: What does God really want?

With such questions burdening my mind, Hebrews 11:1-2 spoke to me: “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. For by it the people of old received their commendation.”

That statement is followed by an inspiring list of people who were commended for their faith. Yes, I know that God’s Word makes it clear that it is faith that pleases Him, but suddenly it took on a life of its own. I realized: ALL my life is about faith. 

Do I trust Him when I have to wait for a long train when I’m on my way to an important appointment? Do I have peace when I’m waiting to get test results from the doctor? Do I know that when I can’t get something done because my frail humanness gets in the way, He has that covered, and isn’t condemning me for being too sick, too tired, too brain weary?

I know that trusting Him in the “big” things is important, but am I practicing with the little things? If a coworker yells at me, am I able to believe at that moment that this, too, is something God will use for good? Faith is the assurance of things hoped for. It is the conviction of things not seen. Let’s encourage each other to exercise and develop our faith muscles in the little things, so we can be ready for the big things. 

The little things please God as much as the big ones.

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